Exercise Cropping

The brief:

Select three of your own photographs. Each should be of a different subject. Perform the same cropping project as you did for the landscape. If digital, first print the original full frame, then crop and print again. Note the results in the form of tracing or sketches with a brief note describing the logic behind your choice of cropping.

(Note to tutor: I have explained my cropping process in the paragraphs below, as I do not have access to Photoshop on my computer. If the tracing or sketches are absolutely necessary please advise and I will do them by hand).

Courtyard of Palacio de los Capitanes Generales, featuring a white marble statue of Christopher Columbus (1862). Habana Vieja. Havana, Cuba.

Figure 1 – Statute of Christopher Columbus (original)

In the photograph of the Courtyard of the Palacio de los Capitanes Generales, featuring a white marble statue of Christopher Columbus (1862) in Havana, Cuba (figure 1) the open space on either side of the pillars framing the statute is distracting. I performed a crop to tighten up this space so that the pillars would touch the side of the frame, thus eliminating the gaps and I also reduced a bit of the foreground, as can be seen in figure 2.

Courtyard of Palacio de los Capitanes Generales, featuring a white marble statue of Christopher Columbus (1862). Habana Vieja. Havana, Cuba.

Figure 2 – Statute of Christopher Columbus – cropped

Figure 3 - Bottles of tequila - original

Figure 3 – Bottles of tequila – original

In figure 3 the wood carving on the right side of the frame dominates the actual subject matter, namely the interesting bottles of tequila and the background is too busy. I performed a very tight crop around two bottles, getting rid of the carving and other half bottle on the right and also cutting the sky, palm trees and umbrella tops, and white linen at the bottom of the frame (figure 4). This crop brings the bottles to the forefront, creating more depth from the background. The background is now more contextual and does not distract.

Figure 4 - Bottles of tequila - cropped

Figure 4 – Bottles of tequila – cropped

 

Figure 5 - Resident of Chinatown - original

Figure 5 – Resident of Chinatown – original

The row of bricks on the right side of the frame in figure 5 is distracting and keeps drawing the eye away from the subject (elderly man in red jacket). I performed a slight crop to remove the brick work and the heavy door frame and a bit of the grey wall above the shop window and the red posts above the yellow sign on frame left (figure 6). In doing this my subject was moved over to a rule of thirds intersecting position and this moves him closer to the viewer and creates a more personal moment as if he is about to meet you.

Figure 6 - Resident of Chinatown - cropped

Figure 6 – Resident of Chinatown – cropped

Advertisements